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GENERAL RULES FOR CALLING THE DOCTOR OR NURSE 210.223.3543

Should an emergency arise call 911 or visit the nearest ER, preferably a children’s ER such as Santa Rosa Children’s Hospital ER, Methodist Children’s Hospital ER or North Central Baptist Hospital Children’s ER. For non-emergencies, please call during office hours. When calling for an emergency, please tell the office telephone operator or answering service that your call is urgent. Ask when the doctor will be available to return your call. If you do not receive a reply within a reasonable period of time, please call again to make sure that there has not been a misunderstanding A parent’s intuition is very important. If you feel uncomfortable about your child’s condition, please say so. If you believe that your child looks healthy despite her present symptoms, report that as well.

WHEN TO CALL IMMEDIATELY AND SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION

INFANTS YOUNGER THAN THREE MONTHS OLD

The baby is lethargic (very sleepy or difficult to wake), has poor color or appears limp and unresponsive.

The baby’s temperature is more than 100.4 F.

The baby refuses to eat three or more times in a row.

The baby’s hands or feet have a yellow “jaundiced” color or the baby develops pumpkin-colored skin.

The baby has repeated bouts of diarrhea or vomiting.

The baby has labored, wheezing or “grunting” breathing pattern that lasts longer than 30 minutes.

The baby develops a rash that looks like bleeding under the skin.

If you feel anxious or uncomfortable about your baby’s illness or general condition.

THE OLDER CHILD

The child seems unresponsive, does not make eye contact or has cold and clammy skin that is not associated with vomiting.

Your child looks much sicker than usual with a “routine illness.”

The child develops a rash that looks like bleeding under the skin.

WHEN TO CALL IMMEDIATELY FOR A SYMPTOM

If you are concerned about your child’s general appearance

The symptoms seem to be getting worse or last longer than expected.

If a fever higher than 101 F has persisted more than 24 hours.

For a cough, cold, sore throat or runny nose that has lasted longer than 48 hours.

Vomiting that has lasted longer than 8 hours or diarrhea for more than 24 hours.

Decreased urination or blood in the stool or vomit.

Severe stomach pains lasting longer than 4 hours.

If the symptoms seem more severe than in the past.

If your child develops a rash or another problem and you are not sure what is causing it.

If you are not certain if your child needs to be seen by her pediatrician.

WHEN TO CALL IMMEDIATELY AFTER TRAUMA OR INJURY

If your child struck her head and/or has nausea, vomiting or complaints of severe headache, has lost consciousness. Also any report of mental confusion, imbalance, poor coordination, memory loss or discharge coming out from an ear.

Persistent swelling, tenderness or irregularity around the injured area.

If your child cannot use the injured extremity for more than 30 minutes.

A deep puncture wound, a cut larger than 1/2″, or if your child has not received a tetanus shot within the last 5 to 10 years.

Eye injuries that cause redness, pain or tearing for more than 15 minutes.

An animal bite that has broken the skin.

Ingestion of a toxic or poisonous substance.

Uncontrolled bleeding or a need for immediate first aid.